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A blog about various business and audio post production topics. We are a Brooklyn-based post studio that cater for advertising, long form, short form, film, branded content, cinema, radio and online. 

Posts in How To
How to Step Up Your Podcasting Game

I don’t need to tell you that podcasting has blown up again and with heavy hitting content like This American Life, Serial, and Mark Maron’s WTF it’s easy to see why. Content is better than ever. But with an influx of great content and more listeners comes a lot of crap and poorly produced podcasts in a saturated market. Anybody can buy a $50 microphone and start recording, and in fact, with increasingly popular companies like Anchor, you don’t even need the damn microphone! This offers amateur users great accessibility and a lot of interesting and niche content.  As a result, you might be wondering, “how can I stand out from the crowd?”. I’m here to answer that question and take you from a bedroom podcaster to a studio quality podcast pro.

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Networking Event Do’s and Don'ts

I personally hate the word ‘entrepreneur’. To me it conjures up images of wannabe rich people just trying to think up ways to create the next fad and make their millions. I’m sick in my mouth a little bit if somebody introduces themselves as an entrepreneur at a networking event but perhaps that’s just me. By definition an entrepreneur is; a person who organizes and operates a business or businesses, taking on greater than normal financial risks in order to do so.

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5 Ways To Impress Clients If You’re Not a People Person

Sound engineers don’t have the best reputation for being pleasant, bubbly folk that just love to go out their way to do you a favor. We’re grumpy bastards. If you’ve ever been to a music gig you would have no doubt noticed the pasty-skinned, long haired, black T-shirt wearing (usually Metallica or Led Zeppelin), slightly sweaty guy behind the mixing desk furiously fiddling with knobs and buttons. I say ‘his’ because there is a serious lack of female presence in the sound engineering industry...but that’s for another blog post. You’ve seen this person and I challenge you to find me one smiling. This goes for the type of sound engineer that I am too, a dubbing mixer (re-recording mixer) or sound designer working on post production audio for TV ads and films. We are seen less by the public eye but are grumpy on a different level. Shut inside a windowless basement staring at a screen all day playing the same 2-second audio clip over and over for hours, and grumbling about why there’s 11 people from the agency sat behind us for a simple voice over recording.

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How to Build a Studio in 77 Square Feet

Welcome to the Square Mile. This is the name I call my studio weighing in at a humble 77 square foot. 7’x11’ to be precise. So…what is one to do with so little space? Research is the first port of call. Most project and bedroom studios are around this size so there’s plenty of information out there on acoustic treatment and utilising the space efficiently. Using that information and translating it to a professional environment that is client friendly, acoustically sound and comfortable is a taller task than one might think though.

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How to Build an Audio Workstation

I’ve had the idea to start my own studio since I first showed interest in the audio realm when I was about 13. In fact, at the age of 14 or 15 my brother and my dad built a recording studio in the garage to have jams and make a bit of cash from recording local bands. I remember saving up for a Tascam Multitrack Recorder and being amazed by the fact I could solo each instrument in the demo track installed on the build in hard drive (that’s right, no cassette tape on this machine!). I started playing around with the EQ and reverb, changing levels and effects. I didn’t know it at the time but I was learning to mix! It was fantastic.

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How To Build A Sound Absorbing Panel In 5 Easy Steps

There are a lot of how-to articles and videos on the net about building acoustic panels for your studio or control room. They're really handy additions to any environment that requires less acoustic reflections and they're cheap and easy to make. I need mine to tighten the acoustics of the listening position in the room I'm currently in. Generally I'm sound designing and mixing commercials for TV which can be less forgiving when it comes to quality control than mixing music. My goal is to make more of these with bass traps also but for now I just built two panels that will be placed at the left and right mirror points from my speakers. Quite honestly, the way in which I built these is not that different to everything else on the interwebs except I did mine in 100-degree weather with a PBR in hand in about 2 hours for $22 per panel. My point is that this is easy to do and shouldn’t be a gruelling or tedious process.

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